Let's Talk About Race

Summary:

The narrative, presented in first person, begins with  “I am a story.” This is followed by questions, some very simple (who are your parents), others more complex (true/false, for example) ... but all parts of your story. What resonates is that everyone’s story is equal, and that those who feel otherwise are showing fear and insecurity. Through questions and simple activities, readers are moved to look past someone’s skin color, hair texture, and eye shape and to consider an individual’s personal story. Because somebody’s story is what makes them unique, because while race is part of the story, it isn't the whole story.


Young Listener (5):
My daughter was not that interested in the drawings so that made it hard for her to enjoy the book. She said they scared her a little. She also said she understood the author was saying not to judge people based on how they look.

BTSYA / Teen Reader (15):
By using first person, the author is able to connect with the reader on a different level, pushing them to engage in simple activiities. His questions move to deeper and deeper levels of interest/engagement for the readers. The main takeaway is that one should look past race and define their own story. The author's questions and statements reinforce the idea that we each have a story, and his goals were complemented by beautiful illustrations on every page. They really brought the words to life and made the reader connect on a deeper level. I really appreciated ahow it strengthensd and reinforces a message everyone should already know: there’s so much more to one’s story than race.

Let's Talk About Race is a good book for every age group because it is teaching and reinforcing an idea that everybody should know and accept. Manypeople still define other people by their race. This tells them to do the complete opposite, and makes it a good message for people of all races to hear and to be reminded of. I recommend borrowing the book from the library. It can easily be finished under 10 minutes, and though it is a good book with a great message, it is not something someone could read over and over again.

Parent Perspective:
I didn't like this book. It was very "in your face" and almost written with a rude attitude. You get the concept of the book within the first few pages and then you feel like someone is just hammering it over and over again. The drawings were also all over the place and sometimes did not relate to what was being said on the page.


Reader Enjoyment Factors:

This is a good book to teach kids that each of us is different, and that rather than looking at the differences, focus on how we are the same.

Content Awareness Factors:

The pictures were not pleasant to look at. The story was too much; it could have been cut in half with the same message.


Type of Book:
This is a book that talks about and encourages kids to celebrate diversity and uniqueness.
Educational Themes:

Use this book as a way to open discussions about judging others, accepting those who are different then you, and getting to know people not based on looks but on who they are

Reading Level:
3.0
Recommended Age To Read By Yourself:
8 and Up
Recommended Age To Read Together:
4 and Up
Age of child:
Read with a 5-year-old girl. Also Teen STAR Review Team, Be the Star You Are!™ . Reviewer age: 15
Purchase Recommendation:
Borrow. This is a useful book for talking with kids about acceptance and diversity, but there are others that don't wear you out half-way through.

Title Let's Talk About Race
About
Author Julius Lester
Publisher HarperCollins Publishers © 2008
Illustrators Karen Barbout
ISBN 9780064462266
Material Hard Cover
Genres Cultures & Tradition
be the star you are
Reminder: Cover images, amazon.com and indiebound.org links are affiliate links. The Reading Tub can earn income via purchases made via these links. 100% of any income goes directly to our literacy mission.
Other Reviews:

You May Also Like...

Check out these books you may also like

BOOK REVIEW

Author
Bryan Stevenson
Publisher
Delacorte Books for Young Readers © 2018
ISBN
9780525580034
be the star you are Cybils

BOOK REVIEW

Author
Deborah Capone
Publisher
As Simple as That © 2005
ISBN
0972866647
Moms Choice Awards

BOOK REVIEW

Author
Michael Tyler
Publisher
Chicago Children's Museum © 2005
ISBN
9780975958001

BOOK REVIEW

Author
Heidi Cole, Nancy Vogl
Publisher
Illumination Arts Publishing Company © 2005
ISBN
0974019054

BOOK REVIEW

Author
Michelle Lord
Publisher
Sterling Children's Books, Imprint Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. © 2019
ISBN
9781454931362
be the star you are

BOOK REVIEW

Author
Angie Thomas
Publisher
Balzer + Bray, Imprint HarperCollins Publishers © 2017
ISBN
9780062498533
be the star you are Cybils